From an imperfect time in history

A very imperfect negative made at an imperfect place where imperfect men fought for what they believed was the perfect cause.  

Codori Farm on the Gettysburg Civil War Battlefield in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.  Made with a 120 year old lens on 4x5" film.  From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" book project which in 2017 is in its third year of shooting.

Technical details:
1947 Pacemaker Speed Graphic 4x5 large format film camera. 
1896 Otto Wernhard 9" F6 Rapid Euryskop brass Lens using the focal plane shutter of the Speed Graphic. 
Orange filter mounted on lens using the Lee gel filter holder.
Ilford FP4+ ISO 125 B&W film, shot at ISO 100. 
1/125th second at F8.
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
4x5" negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holder fitted with ANR glass.
Cropped to 6x12 to match intended composition.

When tree shadows attack

Shadows reach out towards an old officer's quarters building, part of Officer's Row at the old Fort Hancock on the Sandy Hook peninsula of New Jersey. Several of these buildings have undergone renovations in recent years and are being leased out to individuals and companies as part of a renewal plan for the area. 

Fort Hancock was built in 1890 to protect New York Harbor from attack by sea.  It replaced an earlier fort called Fort Gates that was built during the war of 1812.  Fort Hancock included a series of concrete gun batteries built on large concrete foundations and 12 inch barbette guns. The cold war era brought in new defenses including Nike Missiles that could intercept jet fighters.  The surface to air missiles defended the skies from 1954 through 1974 when the fort closed as an active Army base.  The fort complex and it's remaining 35 buildings are now part of the National Parks of New York Harbor under the National Park System and remains a popular Summertime day trip spot with beaches lining the Sandy Hook peninsula and bike rental areas providing transportation for tourists. Sandy Hook Lighthouse, the oldest working lighthouse in the United States is at the center of the Fort complex.  

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.3 Rodenstock Geronar lens. 
Ilford FP4+ ISO 125 B&W film, shot at ISO 100. 
1/30th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.

Poffenberger Farm - Antietam Battlefield

Looking up the gravel and sand road that separates the farm house from the barns on the Joseph Poffenberger Farm found on the grounds of the Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg, Maryland.  On the morning of September 17, 1862 many of the men of Hooker’s First Corps of McClellan’s Army of the Potomac met their demise near here during a key battle of the Civil War.  Later that same day, the farm was used as a field hospital for soldiers wounded in the battle.  Antietam was the scene of the bloodiest one day battle in American history.

From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" book project which in 2017 is in its third year of shooting.

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.8 Rodenstock Geronar lens in Copal BT shutter.
Arista EDU Ultra (Re-branded Fomapan) 200 ISO B&W film, shot at ISO 160. 
1/8th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders with ANR glass.

Looking back to where we came

A scene from the Joseph Poffenberger Farm within the grounds of the Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg, Maryland.  On the morning of September 17, 1862 many of the men of Hooker’s First Corps of McClellan’s Army of the Potomac met their demise near here during a key battle of the Civil War.  Later that same day, the farm was used as a field hospital for soldiers wounded in the battle.  Antietam was the scene of the bloodiest one day battle in American history.

From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" book project which in 2017 is in its third year of shooting.

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.8 Rodenstock Geronar lens in Copal BT shutter. Yellow/Green filter on lens.  Yellow-Green filter on lens. 
Arista EDU Ultra (Re-branded Fomapan) 200 ISO B&W film, shot at ISO 160. 
1/8th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders with ANR glass.
Cropped to 6x12 to match intended composition.

Pinhole of Stone bridge over Bull Run. Manassas Battlefield.

The Fauquier and Alexandria Turnpike bridge over Bull Run, known simply as "the Stone Bridge," was originally built in 1825. Its ability to carry traffic across the steep sided stream even at times of high water gave the Stone Bridge a key role in the Civil War. The Stone Bridge served the needs of the Confederate Army through 1861. On March 9, 1862, the Confederates evacuated their winter camps in Centreville and Manassas in anticipation of fighting closer to Richmond. On orders from General Joseph E. Johnston, the Confederate rear guard blew up the Stone Bridge to prevent its use by the Union forces that soon occupied the area.

Union Army engineers eventually constructed a temporary wooden span across Bull Run using the remaining bridge abutments. This bridge served Union General John Pope's army at Second Manassas, August 28-30, 1862. After suffering another costly defeat, Union forces used the Warrenton Turnpike bridge as their primary line of retreat. In the early hours of August 31, the bridge was again destroyed, this time by the Union rear guard. By 1884, the Stone Bridge was fully rebuilt. The new bridge, very similar to the original bridge, remained open to traffic until 1926. In that year the road was realigned and a modern highway bridge constructed just downstream. The National park Service acquired the Stone Bridge in 1959.

Technical details:
Santa Barbara Pinhole Camera Company 4x5 75mm lensless pinhole film camera.
Fuji HR-T 30 double-sided blue base X-Ray film shot at ISO 80.
8 seconds at F230. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.
Cropped to 6x12 to match intended composition.

Fence building materials at Gettysburg

Wood used by the National Park Service to build and maintain the fencing around the battlefield and farms of Gettysburg.

The John Slyder farm is located close to Devil's Den along Plum Run.  Slyder, a Maryland native, had bought the 75 acre farm in 1849.  On July 2nd 1863, Confederate General John B. Hood’s Division swept across Slyder’s farm in its advance toward the Devil’s Den and Little Round Top. The crops and orchards were trampled and destroyed and the farm buildings became a Confederate field hospital.  Two months after the battle John sold the farm and moved the family to Ohio.  The farm is said to be one of the more active with spirit activity for those drawn to that sort of thing.  

From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" book project which in 2017 is in its third year of shooting.

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.8 Rodenstock Geronar lens in Copal BT shutter. Yellow/Green filter on lens.  
Arista EDU Ultra (Re-branded Fomapan) 200 ISO B&W film, shot at ISO 160. 
1/15th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.

Wood, like wine, best when aged

Another remnant of agriculture during an earlier age, found on the back roads of Adams County, Pennsylvania.

Technical Details:
Nikon F4S 35mm film camera.  Nikon 35-105mm F3.5-4.5 AIS lens.
Kokdak Tri-X 400 film shot at ISO 800.
Developed in Diafine for 4 minutes (part A) and 4 minutes (part B) @ 20 degrees Celsius in Paterson 3 reel tank.  5 seconds initial agitation with swizzle stick followed by 5 seconds of additional agitation ever minute thereafter. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 using holders fitted with ANR glass. 

Shadows and whitewash

The John Slyder farm is located close to Devil's Den along Plum Run.  Slyder, a Maryland native, had bought the 75 acre farm in 1849.  On July 2nd 1863, Confederate General John B. Hood’s Division swept across Slyder’s farm in its advance toward the Devil’s Den and Little Round Top. The crops and orchards were trampled and destroyed and the farm buildings became a Confederate field hospital.  Two months after the battle John sold the farm and moved the family to Ohio.  The farm is said to be one of the more active with spirit activity for those drawn to that sort of thing.  

From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" book project which in 2017 is in its third year of shooting.

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.8 Rodenstock Geronar lens in Copal BT shutter. Yellow/Green filter on lens.  
Arista EDU Ultra (Re-branded Fomapan) 200 ISO B&W film, shot at ISO 160. 
1/15th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.

Sandy Hook Lighthouse

The Sandy Hook Lighthouse is the oldest standing lighthouse in the United States.  Located in Sandy Hook, Monmouth County New Jersey, the 103 foot tall, octagon shaped lighthouse stands at the center of Fort Hancock, a former army base that was setup to protect the New York Harbor approaches.  The lighthouse first came into service in 1764 and a lighthouse keeper actively manned the light until approximately 1913.  During the revolutionary war the British captured the lighthouse.  An attack by the Continental Army led by Benjamin Tupper tried to to destroy the lighthouse with cannon fire to render it useless to the British, but after an hour of volleys, he “found the walls so firm that the cannon fire could make no impression.”  The British continued to hold the lighthouse for much of the rest of the war. The lighthouse is now run by the National Park Service and is part of the Gateway National Recreation Area.  

Technical details:
Toko 4x5 wooden large format field camera.  
150mm F6.3 Rodenstock Geronar lens with Yellow # 8 filter on lens. 
Ilford FP4+ ISO 125 B&W film, shot at ISO 100. 
1/30th second at F32. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.

Eternal rest under the cross

Pinhole photo of one of the more impressive graves found near the entrance of the Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Technical details:
Zero Image 75mm 4x5" wood and brass pinhole (lensless) camera.
Ilford FP4+ ISO 125 B&W film, shot at ISO 100. 
8 seconds at F216. 
Developed in Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 8 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base. 
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders fitted with ANR glass.